Seeing someone you know on a dating site

Posted by / 19-Nov-2019 03:59

People can get the wrong impression, and then before you know it he's gone and updated his profile and added five new photos simply because you logged in to see the last time he logged in.

That's a mess I don't want to be involved in.

Seeing the iris gives us clues as to whether you can be trusted,’ Dr Carbino explained, which kind of makes sense seeing as eyes are the windows to the soul and all that. And if you’re all too familiar with the perils of Tinder, we’ve charted the 12 most soul-destroying things about internet dating. Your Tinder profile is made up of your first name, age, photos of your choice and any pages you’ve ‘liked’ on Facebook.

You can also include your education and occupation in your bio.

As this Quora thread explains, the first profiles we see when we open Tinder are not random or in order of proximity. Alex Mark theorises that the first ten to fifteen cards you see are profiles who haven’t necessarily swiped right on you, but people that have been sorted into the ‘more attractive’ bracket of the site. So that Tinder can convince you that there are LOADS of fit people on the app. That’s why you get more instant matches when you first re-open the app. For the other person it could have been DAYS since they swiped right.

Tinder will apparently add in some non-matches while you swipe, so you don’t get a very obvious string of instant matches within the first minute. And not just because (obviously) you’re able to swipe on more people.

As far as we can tell, if you don’t open the app for ages, your profile is less likely to be shown.

We're all so stuck on the tit-for-tat behavior, I think we're unknowingly sabotaging relationships sometimes.

Plus, who wants to see if someone you just left a date with is already logged in again 15 minutes later?

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I appreciate rules when they outline and help promote basic human decency, sure, but hate them when they prevent me from doing something I really want to do, especially if that thing involves eating cake. Sometimes it's about forcing myself to follow a rule (like not having sex just yet, even though your hormones might be telling you it's time), and sometimes it's about breaking a rule (like not appearing "clingy" by saying you miss him—the eff do I care about that?!